How does the setting in the lottery affect the story?

Essentially, the openness of the setting allows readers to relate to the story in such a way that they can realize it (the lottery) could happen in any idyllic town. Therefore, the setting of “The Lottery” affects the story given the great contradiction it sets up for readers.

Why is the setting important in the lottery?

The setting in the beginning of The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson, creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquillity. The image portrayed by the author is that of a typical town on a normal summer day. … This is important to get the reader to focus on what a typical day it is in this small town.

How does the setting contribute to the theme in the lottery?

“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson is a story in which the setting sets up the reader to think of positive outcomes. … To begin, Shirley Jackson tells the reader what time of day and what time of year the story takes place. This is important to get the reader to focus on what a typical day it is in this small town.

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How did the author of the lottery describe the setting of the story did it affect the mood of the story?

Shortly after the lottery commences, the peaceful setting seems menacing and ominous. As the lottery gets underway, the mood of the story also becomes anxious and unsettling. When Tessie Hutchinson’s name is called, the mood shifts to dreadful and violent as the community members prepare to stone her to death.

How does the setting of the lottery contribute to the surprise ending?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” really helps to surprise the reader at the end of the story, because everything about the setting stands in sharp contrast to the violence that happens in the final paragraphs. The story ends with an entire community gleefully stoning a fellow community member to death.

What happens in the story the lottery?

“The Lottery” is a short story by Shirley Jackson that depicts a small town’s annual lottery. … A second lottery is held with five slips of paper: one for each of the members of Bill’s family. His wife, Tessie, draws the black dot, and her neighbors stone her to death.

In what way does the setting of the story the lottery support its title?

“The Lottery” is set in an unnamed village in an unnamed time period. This setting indicates that the events that happen there could happen in any place at any time, making the theme of blindly following tradition universally applicable.

What type of setting does Jackson use How does that setting create a feeling or expectation for the reader?

The setting set forth by Shirley Jackson in the beginning of „The Lottery“ creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquillity. This setting creates an image in the mind of the reader of a typical town on a normal summer day. … To begin, she tells the reader what time of day and what time of year the story takes place.

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What is the conflict of the story The Lottery?

There is conflict between Bill Hutchinson and Tessie about him not being able to choose a random slip of paper at his own pace. You also see conflict when Tessie is arguing with everyone towards the end of the story about “The Lottery” not being fair its cruelty.

How does the lottery affect Tessie Hutchinson and her family at the end of the story?

Near the end of “The Lottery,” Bill Hutchinson draws the slip with the black spot in the first round, which means that someone in his family will be stoned to death. This immediately begins to cause friction within the family and between Bill’s wife Tessie and some of people in the assembled crowd.